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Kohler

Kohler
An ad that is based
on art rather than craft, looks
good but sells little.

New fEMG Study Shows Value in Combining Neuromarketing and Survey-Based Advertising Testing

In a new study of advertising content that combined both neuro-physiological measures and traditional copy test measures, G&R has found that the two assessment approaches can yield different guidance when evaluating copy effectiveness. Commercials with strong emotional activation as measured by facial electromyography (fEMG) may not have high recall or persuasion, and visa-versa. In other studies, we have found positive correlations between fEMG and recall or fEMG and persuasion. Continue Reading →

Plnt


Too many ideas
in one ad can confuse and
turn off the reader.

EEG and fEMG: What Facebook’s and Expedia’s Different Takes Say about Consumer Neuroscience Today

Facebook has conducted a series of studies to show the relative value of mobile advertising over television advertising. The studies are based on EEG.

Expedia has opened a dedicated neuroscience lab to look at what influences how people decide to travel. The Lab is based on fEMG.

What does the use of these two fundamentally different neuroscience measures by these two very successful companies say about the current state of applied neuroscience? Continue Reading →

Cisco


A guide for cogent
corporate advertising:
sincere, not fulsome

Are Small Samples in Neuro Reliable? Some Thoughts about Power

One of the first issues that market researchers face when they start to think about neuro-physiological measurement is how to think about the small sample sizes. Survey research is usually based on samples in the hundreds or even in the thousands, but it is not uncommon for User Experience testing to be based on ten (10) people. In fact, some fMRI studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals based on five (5) respondents.

This raises a very important question: Are such small samples reliable? Continue Reading →